Trinity Sunday: Year A

The God who creates, redeems, and sanctifies is revealed to us in three persons.

  • Genesis 1:1-24a
  • Psalm 8 or Canticle 2 or Canticle 13
  • 2 Corinthians 12:11-13
  • Matthew 28:16-20

The relationship of love among the three persons of the Trinity serves as a model for communities baptized Christians living together in unity.

Trinity Sunday is the first Sunday after Pentecost. It has been part of the Church since 1334, when it was designated in commemoration of the doctrine of the Trinity, the belief that God is revealed to us in three persons existing in a mutual relationship of love. It is the total revelation of God: God the Father as Creator; God the Son as Redeemer; God the Holy Spirit as Sanctifier and Comforter. Our understanding of the Trinity arises from the biblical, creedal, and doctrinal statements that emerged from the creative struggles of theologians in the church to understand and talk about the nature of God.

In the Book of Common Prayer, the Trinity is emphasized throughout the service of Holy Baptism, especially in the Baptismal Covenant (BCP 304-305), the Thanksgiving over the Water (BCP 306-307), and the baptism itself (BCP 307-308). The prayer for the renewal of the Baptismal Covenant said by the bishop before confirmation (BCP 309) refers to each of the persons of the Trinity in their relationship to the life of a committed Christian.

The historic creeds that appear in the prayer book are sources of our understanding of the Trinity:

  • The Apostles’ Creed (BCP 96)
  • The Nicene Creed (BCP 326-327)
  • The Creed of St. Athanasius (BCP 864-865)

Additional resources:

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About Sharon Ely Pearson

Editor and Christian Formation Specialist for Church Publishing Incorporated
This entry was posted in Feast Days, Ordinary Time, Pentecost and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Trinity Sunday: Year A

  1. Pingback: Trinity Sunday, Year B: June 3, 2012 | The Prayer Book Guide to Christian Education

  2. Ann Fontaine says:

    The Trinity is a lot more fun than just a doctrine. Dancing, shimmering, elusive yet real

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